Ende dieses Seitenbereichs.

Beginn des Seitenbereichs: Inhalt:

Myriam Hernández Domínguez (University of La Laguna, Tenerife)

Dienstag, 23.04.2019

Doctoral research supervised by Mónica Cano Abadía, PhD

The Section of Political Philosophy (Institute of Philosophy, University of Graz) will be the institution that will host Myriam Hernández Domínguez (University of La Laguna, Tenerife) during her doctoral research stay between April and June 2019. This doctoral stay and Hernández Domínguez’s research during this time will be supervised by Mónica Cano Abadía, PhD, University Assistant at the Section of Political Philosophy. 

The researcher:

Myriam Hernández Domínguez holds a B.A (2017) and an M.A (2018) in Philosophical Studies from the University of La Laguna (Spain). She is starting her Ph.D. in Moral Philosophy and she is currently enjoying a short stay at the Section of Political Philosophy (Institute of Philosophy, University of Graz). She is also a member of the Research Project "Justice, Citizenship and Vulnerability" (University of La Laguna) and the Research Group "Rethinking Philosophy" (University of La Laguna). Her research is funded by the Spanish Government, Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities.

The Thesis Project:

The fourth Industrial Revolution under way, featured by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and robotization, urges us to rethink, from an ethics point of view, key concepts in philosophical enquiry on body and work. Technological development, as presently embedded in working environment, strays onto a drift where we identify disturbing dynamics that drives to precariousness. The application of regulatory criteria would be most welcome, in a scenario of increasing inequalities that seems to steer a course to the dystopic horizon of the post-work era. In digital bio-economics, the body configurates as “factory-body” and its psycho-physical limits are constantly overrun by an excessive demand of productivity and efficiency. The call is for a “resilient” type of worker, so it is assumed that work-related activity takes shape as a succession of traumatic events. Without technophobia but with much uncertainty, we confront the technological change where bots, cobots and robots coexist in interfaces with (post)human bodies and their environment. 

The purpose of this Doctoral Thesis is to think, prospective and immanently, future work scenarios triggered by AI in interface with (post)human, in the context of reasserted job insecurity. To that end, we will establish a dialogue between materialist and vitalist philosophies of corporeality, the Science, Technology and Society (STS) approaches and the critical post-humanism. The interest of this Doctoral Thesis lies in the attempt to rethink the complex scenario shaped by new conceptions of work and new technologies, from the standpoint of the bodies, nature and feminism, as well as the relations with others (humans and non-humans) that feature the new materialisms. 

Ende dieses Seitenbereichs.

Beginn des Seitenbereichs: Zusatzinformationen:


Ende dieses Seitenbereichs.